Press releases

Through press releases, the Swedish Prosecution Authority announce press conferences and provides information on a selection of cases.

  • Prosecution for War Crimes in Iran

    Today, a decision has been taken to prosecute an Iranian citizen suspected of committing grave war crimes and murder in Iran during 1988. The Swedish public prosecutors Kristina Lindhoff Carleson and Martina Winslow are available for brief comments this afternoon.

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    Today, a decision has been taken to prosecute an Iranian citizen suspected of committing grave war crimes and murder in Iran during 1988. The Swedish public prosecutors Kristina Lindhoff Carleson and Martina Winslow are available for brief comments this afternoon.

    Part 1: War crimes Between 1981 and 1988 there was an international armed conflict between Iran and Iraq. In the final phase of this armed conflict, Iran was attacked on several occasions, including on 26 July 1988, by an armed branch of the political organisation, Iranian People's Mujahedin. The Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini, shortly afterwards issued an order to execute all prisoners held in Iranian prisons who sympathised with and were loyal in their convictions to the Mujahedin. Following this order, a large number of such prisoners were executed between 30 July and 16 August 1988 in the Gohardasht prison in Karaj, Iran. According to the indictment, at the time of these mass executions the accused held the position of assistant to the deputy prosecutor at the Gohardasht prison. The accused is suspected of participating, together with other perpetrators, in these mass executions and, as such, intentionally taking the lives of a large number of prisoners, who sympathised with the Mujahedin and, additionally, of subjecting prisoners to severe suffering which is deemed torture and inhuman treatment. The indictment further states that the Mujahedin was involved in the international armed conflict between Iran and Iraq. The Mujahedin’s attacks originated in Iraqi territory, and were carried out in cooperation with the Iraqi army. It is stated that there was a connection between the armed conflict and these mass executions, which is why these acts are deemed as a grave crime committed in violation of internationalhumanitarian law. Part 2: Murder                                                        At some point between these mass executions and 27 August 1988, the Iranian leadership decided that other political prisoners held in Iranian prisons and who sympathised with various left wing groups and were regarded as apostates by the Iranian leadership, should be executed. As a result, a large number of these prisoners were executed between 27 August and 6 September 1988 in the Gohardasht prison in Karaj, Iran. According to the indictment filed today, the accused is suspected of intentionally killing, together with other perpetrators, a large number of prisoners who sympathised with various left wing groups and who were regarded as apostates. These acts are classified as murder according to the Swedish Penal Code since they are not considered to be related to an armed conflict. “War crimes are considered to be some of the most serious criminal acts not only within our national legislation, but also within the international law. These types of crimes are regarded as so grave that, irrespective of who committed them or where they were committed, national courts are able and obligated to conduct proceedings where necessary. Therefore, legal proceedings can be initiated also in Sweden, due to international obligations and the principle of universal jurisdiction,” stated public prosecutor Kristina Lindhoff Carleson. “This extensive investigation resulting in this indictment shows that even though these acts were committed beyond Sweden’s territory and for more than three decades ago, they can be subject to legal proceedings in Sweden,” stated Public Prosecutor Kristina Lindhoff Carleson. “Swedish domestic legislation does not include crimes against humanity committed before 1 July 2014 and could not be relied on in this indictment as the alleged criminal acts took place before that date. Therefore, the indictment involves crimes against the international law i.e. war crimes as well as murder,” Kristina Lindhoff Carleson clarifies. Victims, witnesses and experts in the field from various parts of the world will be heard during the proceedings, which are expected to commence on 10 August 2021 and continue until April 2022. Case number in the Stockholm District Court: B 15255-19.   Contact  The public prosecutors are available today for brief comments between the hours of 13.00–15.00. Kristina Lindhoff Carleson, +46 10 562 54 31 Martina Winslow, +46 10 562 54 21   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • New Content on Prosecutor.se

    The Swedish Prosecution Authority´s English webpage has been updated. The purpose is to offer new content which is better adapted to foreign visitors. The webpage now contains answers to frequently asked questions about how the Swedish judicial system works, and prosecutors´ role within it.

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    The Swedish Prosecution Authority´s English webpage has been updated. The purpose is to offer new content which is better adapted to foreign visitors. The webpage now contains answers to frequently asked questions about how the Swedish judicial system works, and prosecutors´ role within it.

    A new part of the webpage that aims to raise awareness of the Swedish judicial system is a timeline describing the various stages from when a person is arrested to when a verdict is given. “The timeline´s aim is to guide our visitors through prosecutors´ central role, and at the same time provide knowledge about how the Swedish judicial system works,” says Karin Rosander, Director of Communication. One of the target groups who visit the webpage is foreign journalists in need of assistance in gaining knowledge of Swedish prosecutors´ role. “Our Swedish judicial system is different if you compare it to other countries. For example, we do not have a bail system, state or district public prosecutors, or a jury in Sweden. It´s important that this is clear when journalists report on Swedish cases of international interest,” says Karin Rosander. www.prosecutor.se   Contact  Director of Communication, Karin Rosander, +46 10 562 50 10.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Investigation into serious breach of data secrecy by Russian intelligence agency discontinued

    During the period December 2017 to May 2018, the Swedish Sports Confederation was the target of repeated and comprehensive breaches of their computer system in Sweden. The offence is classified as serious breach of data secrecy. Today, the prosecutor has decided to discontinue the investigation due to the lack of the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden.

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    During the period December 2017 to May 2018, the Swedish Sports Confederation was the target of repeated and comprehensive breaches of their computer system in Sweden. The offence is classified as serious breach of data secrecy. Today, the prosecutor has decided to discontinue the investigation due to the lack of the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden.

    Under the direction of a prosecutor from the National Security Unit, the Swedish Security Service has investigated who or what has carried out the data breaches and for what purpose. The investigation has cooperated with several other nation’s security services. ”The investigation shows that the Russian military intelligence, GRU who, via its 85th Center, also known as unit 26165, has planned and carried out the serious breaches of data secrecy against the Swedish Sports Confederation. We can further state that the breaches have been a part of a Russian campaign directed against national and international anti-doping organisations such as WADA and USADA. The campaign has also been directed against FIFA,” says public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist. The data breaches have resulted in GRU accessing Swedish athletes’ personal details, such as medical records. ”The information has been published openly and, based on these details, Swedish media have written articles which follow GRU’s narrative of discrediting athletes and sports organisations in the West,” says Mats Ljungqvist. “Against the background of parties acting for a foreign power, in this case Russia, we have reached the conclusion that the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden are lacking. I have, therefore, today decided to discontinue the investigation,” concludes Mats Ljungqvist. Contact Public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist is available for the media today between 11 am to 1 pm by phone +46 10 562 54 29.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • A person indicted for espionage

    Today, a 47-year old man has been indicted for espionage. The person is suspected of meeting a Russian diplomat over a number of years with the purpose of providing information in return for money. The investigation has been undertaken by the Swedish Security Service under the direction of a prosecutor at the National Security Unit of the Swedish Prosecution Authority. The prosecutor is available for the media today.

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    Today, a 47-year old man has been indicted for espionage. The person is suspected of meeting a Russian diplomat over a number of years with the purpose of providing information in return for money. The investigation has been undertaken by the Swedish Security Service under the direction of a prosecutor at the National Security Unit of the Swedish Prosecution Authority. The prosecutor is available for the media today.

    ”As a consultant at his former workplaces, I allege that he has obtained material with the purpose of providing information to a foreign power, in this case Russia. He has been well-paid for this information, and this shows the value the Russians place on the information provided. The man was apprehended whilst meeting a Russian diplomat where he had just received 27 800 Swedish crowns from the diplomat,” says the prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist. According to the indictment, the man has illegally transferred material from his work computer to his private computer and thereafter to USB memory sticks. In order to hide his activities from being logged by the IT system, he has also, amongst other things, photographed material from the screen of his work computer. In the prosecutor’s view, this case concerns a crime that places Sweden’s security at risk. ”The investigators have put in a lot of time in order to understand the material so as to assess it from the perspective of Sweden’s security. It is important to emphasise that Sweden is the injured party in this case and not the companies. This is because the suspect originally had authorisation from his employers to access the material in his position. To disseminate such company secrets which a person has access to in their position is not a crime in itself. It can, however, be espionage,” says Mats Ljungqvist. The maximum punishment for the crime of espionage is six years’ imprisonment. ”My view is that the crime is serious and, if convicted, the suspect could expect a lengthy sentence,” concludes Mats Ljungqvist. Case reference number 18657-20, Gothenburg District Court. Contact Public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist is available for the media today until 13.30, +46 10 562 54 29.     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Today, Director of Public Prosecution, Mikael Björk has issued an indictment for aggravated assault in a case where three people had synthetic tracheas implanted at Karolinska University Hospital. The prosecutor is available to the media on telephone for brief comments.

    On 11 December 2018, Mikael Björk decided to reopen a previously discontinued investigation into two cases of causing physical injury, serious crime. Both cases concern two individuals who had synthetic tracheas implanted. During the reopened investigation, the investigation into another case of causing physical injury, serious crime, has been reopened. This concerns a third individual who has had a synthetic trachea implanted. - During the reopened investigation, additional written evidence was obtained and more interviews were held with individuals in Sweden, Belgium, the United Kingdom, the United States and Spain. As a result of these interviews and the written evidence obtained, it has become clear to me that the operations were carried out in conflict with science and proven experience, and were therefore not carried out based on any legal form of medical care or licensed research study, says Director of Public Prosecution Mikael Björk at the Development Centre at the Swedish Prosecution Authority. - The operations, which have caused the three injured parties serious physical injuries and great suffering, have been carried out with absolutely no legal basis. I have made the assessment that the three operations are therefore to be judged as aggravated assault rather than causing physical injury, serious crime, and that it is the former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital who alone should bear the criminal responsibility. Upon reinterview, he has been notified that he is suspected on reasonable grounds of aggravated assault in three cases. These criminal suspicions, as well as the original suspicions of causing physical injury, serious crime, are completely denied by the suspect, says Mikael Björk. Mikael Björk will not currently provide further details as to why he believes the operations were carried out with no legal basis and are therefore to be judged as three cases of aggravated assault. These details and explanations will first be made at the upcoming main hearing. - I have assessed that the degree of evidence provides sufficient reason to issue an indictment for aggravated assault in three cases and I have, therefore, earlier today submitted such an indictment to Solna District Court, says Mikael Björk. During large parts of the reopened investigation, Mikael Björk has been assisted by two prosecutors. - We have also received comprehensive and extremely competent investigative assistance from the National Operative Department at the Swedish Police Authority, says Mikael Björk. Solna District Court case number: B 10553–18 Contact  Director of Public Prosecution Mikael Björk will be available for short media interviews via phone today, 29 September, between 10.00 and 11.30. Phone: +46 10 562 71 02 The next occasion Mikael Björk will be available for the media will be following the trial’s final day. The date and time will be communicated via a new press release. Solna District Court sets the date for the main hearing. As of now, this date is not known.     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Verdict in Matter with Former Ambassador

    Tomorrow, Friday 10 July, the Stockholm District Court will pronounce judgment in the court matter with Sweden’s former ambassador to China who has been indicted with arbitrariness during negotiations with a foreign power. The prosecutor will be available to the media on telephone.

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    Tomorrow, Friday 10 July, the Stockholm District Court will pronounce judgment in the court matter with Sweden’s former ambassador to China who has been indicted with arbitrariness during negotiations with a foreign power. The prosecutor will be available to the media on telephone.

    Case number at Stockholm District Court: B 3911-19. Contact  Public Prosecutor Henrik Olin is available for brief conversations to the media tomorrow, Friday, by telephone between 12:00-13:00 on +46 (0)10-562 53 85.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • The survey is closed.

    Please answer our two-question survey to help us improve your experience visiting our English website, prosecutor.se Thank you!     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson today, Wednesday 10 June, decided to discontinue the investigation into the murder of the former prime minister of Sweden, Olof Palme, which dates back to 28 February 1986 on the grounds that the "suspect is deceased”.

    Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson announced his decision during a digital press conference together with the Swedish Police Authority on Wednesday morning. According to Petersson, the killing is believed to have been performed by the lone perpetrator, Stig Engström. “As the person is deceased, I cannot bring charges against him and have decided to discontinue the investigation. In my opinion, Stig Engström is the prime suspect. My assessment is that, after oveer 34 years, it is difficult to believe that any further investigation would provide us with any new details and therefore I believe we have come as far as one could expect”, says Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson. In the investigation, testimonies, statements and witness interviews were all analysed. To a large extent, we have been at the mercy of the police investigative work that was performed closer to the time of the crime. The current Palme investigation has not been able to repeat such investigative work. “This concerns, among other things, the descriptions provided of Stig Engström which correspond well with several witness statements. His own statement concerning his actions during the period of time the crime was committed does not reconcile with statements provided by others. The evidence strongly suggests he was at the crime scene, but in a completely different role than the one he wished to present. All in all, there are a number of circumstances that point to Engström. Had the current Palme investigation group been in charge 34 years ago, Stig Engström would have been remanded in custody had he been unable to provide satisfactory explanations for his movements and actions. My assessment is that there would have been sufficient evidence to have him detained in custody”, says Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson. “At one time we had a reasonable chance of securing the murder weapon as well as other evidence, and to investigate whether he had acted as part of a wider conspiracy. Now this is not possible”, Krister Petersson concludes. Head of Investigation Hans Melander, who also attended the press conference, says that the Palme investigation is one of the world's largest investigations. “It is by far Sweden's largest criminal investigation and is sometimes compared with the murder of JFK and Lockerbie bombing. It has been ongoing since 1986 and contains 22,430 different points of interest. 90,000 people are included in the preliminary investigation of which 40,000 are named. More than 10,000 people have been interviewed, many of them several times. More than 4,000 vehicles were investigated. And 134 people have confessed to committing the murder, including 29 directly to the police”, says Head of Investigation Hans Melander. The prosecutor and police are only available for interviews for those who have pre-registered. The decision translated into English Photo of Krister Petersson     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • The Swedish Prosecution Authority and the Swedish Police Authority invite the media to a digital press conference on Wednesday 10 June at 9.30 am. Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson will present his decision in the case and, together with Head of the Investigation Hans Melander, he will provide details concerning the investigation.

    The press conference will be held digitally and broadcasted on both the Swedish Prosecution Authority’s and the Swedish Police Authority’s YouTube channels respectively. The press conference will be interpreted into English and broadcasted on this YouTube-channel. There will be the opportunity to conduct individual interviews afterwards. This means that journalists cannot be physically present at the press conference. The reason for this is that we estimate that more than 50 people would be present in the conference room during a physical press conference. Pre-registered journalists will be able to place questions in an open Q&A session via a link directly after the presentations. Individual interviews afterwards Following the press conference, Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson will be available via Skype or telephone. This is due to him belonging to a risk group. Head of the Investigation Hans Melander will be physically present to the media after the press conference. Compulsory registration to question and answer session and individual interviews Journalists who wish to participate in the Q&A session must register in advance. One person per media house will have the opportunity to place questions during the open session. Due to time constraints, each journalist can place only one or two questions. Register at [email protected] by e-mailing a picture of your press credential or a certificate from your editorial client. When you receive confirmation of your registration, you will also receive information on how to connect digitally to the press conference and how the Q&A session will operate. Journalists who wish to interview Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson afterwards must register at [email protected] Please provide the same information as for the Q&A session, as well as to which e-mail address you wish to receive the invitation. You will receive a time slot in your final invitation. If you wish to interview Head of Investigation, Hans Melander, who will be physically present following the press conference, please send an interview inquiry to [email protected] All registrations must be received before 3 pm on Monday 8 June. Please note that if there are an exceptional number of questions during the Q&A session on 10 June and/or requests for individual interviews, then due to time constraints we may have to limit the number of journalists who are able to place questions. Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson will also be available for interviews on 11 and 12 June at 10 am–3 pm. If necessary, we will get back to journalists who could not be prioritized on 10 June. Press Contact: Press Service, the Swedish Prosecution Authority, +46 10 562 50 20 Annika Collin, Press Manager, the Swedish Prosecution Authority +46 10 562 50 15 Anna Knöfel Magnusson, Press Officer, the Swedish Prosecution Authority +46 10 562 51 99 Press Service, the Swedish Police Authority +46 10 563 91 70     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • The prosecutor intends to take a decision concerning prosecution matters in the Palme investigation before 1 July. Please find below information for the media regarding the decision.

    The Swedish Prosecution Authority and the Swedish Police Authority will issue invitations in due time before the decision. The press conference will be held digitally, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Afterwards there will be opportunities to conduct individual interviews with both the police and prosecutor. This means that journalists cannot be physically present at the press conference. The reason for this is that we estimate that more than 50 people would be present in the conference room during a physical meeting. There will be simultaneous interpretation into English. Both audio and video will be linked, which allows radio and TV companies to broadcast the press conference live. The media will be able to participate via a link, through which it will be possible to place questions during an open Q&A session at the end of the press conference. Chief Prosecutor, Krister Petersson and Head of the Investigation, Hans Melander, are not available to the media before the press conference. Individual interviews afterwards After the press conference, Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson will be available to the media via Skype or telephone. This is due to him belonging to a risk group. Head of the Investigation, Hans Melander, will be physically present to the media after the press conference. You will receive information about place and time later. Instructions and times for the individual interviews will be included in the press conference invitation. Media contacts Annika Collin, the Swedish Prosecution Authority +46 10 562 50 15 Anna Knöfel Magnusson, the Swedish Prosecution Authority +46 10 562 51 99 Press Service, the Swedish Police Authority +46 10 56 391 70     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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