Press releases

Through press releases, the Swedish Prosecution Authority announce press conferences and provides information on a selection of cases.

  • Appeal to the Court of Appeal in high-profile synthetic trachea case

    Director of Public Prosecution Mikael Björk, in consultation with Chief Public Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron, has today appealed the verdict of Solna District Court (16 June 2022) in the case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital was prosecuted with aggravated assault of three persons who had received synthetic trachea implants.

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    Director of Public Prosecution Mikael Björk, in consultation with Chief Public Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron, has today appealed the verdict of Solna District Court (16 June 2022) in the case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital was prosecuted with aggravated assault of three persons who had received synthetic trachea implants.

    The defendant was sentenced in the District Court to a conditional sentence for causing bodily harm in one of the cases. The prosecutors request, in the appeal of today, that the defendant be sentenced to imprisonment for three counts of aggravated assault or, alternatively, for causing bodily harm, aggravated offence. Even if the Court of Appeal accepts the District Court's assessment of the question of guilt, it is requested that the sentence will be set at imprisonment. “I consider that the defendant has been guilty of risk-taking of a serious nature in respect of all three injured parties. In all cases, the interventions were contrary to science and best practice. Furthermore, a wide range of circumstances clearly show that the interventions were research, as demonstrated by the evidence we have adduced. It seems clear to me that these have been completely unlawful human experiments and the penalty should be a long prison sentence, given the nature of the crime and the high penal value,” says Director of Public Prosecution Mikael Björk. According to the District Court's assessment, the judgment is based in its entirety on the necessity clause of the Penal Code. This is opposed by the prosecutors. “In our view, the three injured parties were not in danger within the meaning of the Penal Code. In order for an act to be considered necessary for the elimination of the danger, it should reasonably be required that the act in question can eliminate the threatening danger with some degree of probability. A completely unproven method involving the replacement of a vital organ with a plastic tube cannot be said to be of this kind,” says Chief Public Prosecutor Jim Westerberg. “I consider that the evidence adduced overwhelmingly supports the conclusion that in none of the three occasions there was a reasonably imminent danger that the three plaintiffs would die. One of many clear examples of this is that there was plenty of time for the synthetic tracheas to be manufactured in the UK and the US and then transported to Sweden for the planned operations," says Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron. Case number in Solna District Court: B 10553-18. It is The Svea Court of Appeal that decides when the main hearing starts. The prosecutors are not available to the media. The appeal (in Swedish)  Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • On Thursday 16 June at 11 am Solna District Court will pass sentence in a case where a former surgeon is prosecuted for aggravated assault of three persons who had synthetic tracheas implanted. The prosecutors are available to the media in the afternoon.

    Chief Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be available to the media for short interviews on telephone Thursday 14-16 pm. You cannot pre-book interviews. Solna District Court case number: B 10553-18.  Contact  Jim Westerberg, interviews with Swedish media, +46 (0)10 562 70 54. Karin Lundström-Kron, interviews with Swedish and international media, +46 (0)10 562 72 10.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • The press conference with chief prosecutor Jim Westerberg and senior prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be held at 11.30 AM

    Due to the fact that the trial has been postponed in the case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital is prosecuted for aggravated assault, the press conference with chief prosecutor Jim Westerberg and senior prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be held at 11.30 AM. No pre-bookings can be made for the interviews.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Prosecutors available to the media tomorrow at Solna District Court

    Chief Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be available tomorrow Wednesday for short media interviews concerning the case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital is prosecuted for aggravated assault of three people who had synthetic tracheas implanted at Karolinska University Hospital.

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    Chief Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be available tomorrow Wednesday for short media interviews concerning the case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital is prosecuted for aggravated assault of three people who had synthetic tracheas implanted at Karolinska University Hospital.

    Solna District Court case number: B 10553-18. Place and time Solna District Court, in a public space in the premises of the district court, on 4 May after the main hearing around 16:30. No pre registration is required. The prosecutors are only available in person in the district court.     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Tomorrow, Wednesday 27 April at 9 a.m, the main hearing starts in Solna District Court in a case where a former surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital is prosecuted for aggravated assault of three people who had synthetic tracheas implanted at Karolinska University Hospital. All three persons have deceased.

    Solna District Court case number: B 10553-18.  Chief Prosecutor Jim Westerberg and Senior Prosecutor Karin Lundström-Kron will be available for short media interviews at Solna District Court on 4 May at 5 p.m. Details concerning this will be announced next week. The prosecutors will not be available to the media before that.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Prosecution for complicity in grave war crimes in Sudan

    Today, the prosecutor has decided to indict two representatives of the then named company Lundin Oil AB for complicity in grave war crimes in Sudan from 1999 to 2003. They are suspected of having been complicit in war crimes committed by the then Sudanese regime with the purpose of securing the company’s oil operations in southern Sudan. The prosecutors are available to the media this afternoon.

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    Today, the prosecutor has decided to indict two representatives of the then named company Lundin Oil AB for complicity in grave war crimes in Sudan from 1999 to 2003. They are suspected of having been complicit in war crimes committed by the then Sudanese regime with the purpose of securing the company’s oil operations in southern Sudan. The prosecutors are available to the media this afternoon.

    One of the representatives is indicted for complicity for the period May 1999 to March 2003, and the other for the period October 2000 to March 2003. In the prosecutor’s view, these two indicted representatives had a decisive influence on Lundin Oil’s business in Sudan. In connection with the indictment, there is also a claim to confiscate an amount of 1 391 791 000 SEK from Lundin Energy AB, which, according to the prosecutor, is the equivalent value of the profit of 720 098 000 SEK which the company made on the sale of the business in 2003. The situation in Sudan at the time of the suspected crime From 1991, Lundin Oil had business operations in Sudan. For many years, there was a civil war which was characterized by a lack of respect for international humanitarian law, i.e. the laws of armed conflict. As the country opened up for oil exploration, oil and control of the oil fields in southern Sudan became contentious issues in the civil war. In southern Sudan, Lundin Oil had, since 1997 and via a wholly-owned subsidiary, started oil exploration in an area called Block 5A, approximately 30 000 square kilometers. Until this time, this area had been relatively spared from the affects of the civil war, which had been going on for several years, but until 2003 it became one of the worst affected areas. The development after the oil exploration started According to a local peace agreement, which took effect from 1997, between the Sudanese government and several militia groups from the southern states, the responsibility for peace and security in areas including Block 5A was given to the southern states’ military forces and not the Sudanese military. In accordance with this agreement, these military forces were responsible for the security around Lundin Oil’s operations when the company started the operations in 1997. In connection with the start of the business operations, a militia group allied to the regime led a series of attacks to take control of Block 5A, but failed. These attacks led to great suffering amongst civilians. Shortly after Lundin Oil had found oil in Block 5A during 1999, the Sudanese military, together with the same militia group allied to the regime, led offensive military operations to take control of the area and create the necessary preconditions for Lundin Oil’s oil exploration. This led to series of fighting that, with short interruptions, lasted until Lundin Oil left the area during 2003. In the view of the prosecutor, the Sudanese government, through the military and militia allied to the regime, carried out a war in conflict with international humanitarian law and that, according to Swedish law, constitutes grave war crimes. ”In our view, the investigation shows that the military and its allied militia systematically attacked civilians or carried out indiscriminate attacks. For example, aerial bombardments from transport planes, shooting civilians from helicopter gunships, abducting and plundering civilians and burning entire villages and their crops so that people did not have anything to live by. Consequently, many civilians were killed, injured and displaced from Block 5A”, says Head of the Investigation, Public Prosecutor Henrik Attorps. Furthermore, the prosecutor argues that the accused, in different ways, were complicit in war crimes. It is this complicity that is now under indictment. ”Directly after the military went into Block 5A in May 1999, in breach of the local peace agreement, Lundin Oil changed its view of who should be responsible for the security around the company’s operations. The company then requested from the Sudanese government that the military should now be made responsible for the security, knowing that this meant that the military would then need to take control of Block 5A via military force. What constitutes complicity in a criminal sense is that they made these demands despite understanding or, in any case being indifferent to the military and the militia carrying out the war in a way that was forbidden according to international humanitarian law”, says Chief Public Prosecutor Krister Petersson. In the prosecutor’s view, from May 1999 the indicted individuals continued to promote crimes that the military and its allied militia were to commit to enable the continued oil operations until March 2003. Amongst other things, the company undertook vis-a-vis the Sudanese government to build roads in areas that were not in the control of the military or the militia allied to the regime. Furthermore, the company informed the government of the oil exploration planned in such areas. This required that the military and militia needed to take control of the areas via military force before the activities could start. By using such military force the military and militia allied to the regime committed crimes against the civilian population. The prosecutor’s evidence The evidence in this case is comprehensive and consists of various parts. One part concerns proving the main crime - grave war crimes – which were committed by unknown people within the Sudanese government as well as the military and the militia allied to the regime. ”The main evidence here consists of a large number of civilians who have been subject to attacks. We will also hear witnesses who followed and studied the situation in Sudan and, amongst other things, met refugees and heard their stories. Besides this, we will rely on written reports from the area, primarily from the UN and other international organisations as well as from journalists who observed the area”, says Public Prosecutor Karolina Wieslander. Additional evidence aims at proving that the indicted persons were complicit in the crimes committed. The evidence here consists of, amongst other things, how the organisation within the company and its internal reporting on the situation in Sudan looked as well as what communication took place with the Sudanese government. In this respect, the prosecution relies on several witnesses connected to the company. About the investigation The investigation started in 2010. It concerns a complex and complicated criminality which took place for several years and in a large geographic area during an ongoing civil war. During the investigation, a new civil war broke out which meant it was not possible to travel to the area. In contrast to crimes in, for example, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia and Syria, there are no international courts or investigative mechanisms concerning Sudan, which could have supported the Swedish investigation. ”It is important that these serious crimes are not forgotten. War crimes are one of the most serious crimes that Sweden has an international obligation to investigate and bring to justice. A large number of civilians suffered as a result of the Sudanese regime’s crimes, which we argue the indicted were complicit in. Many of the civilians who survived were forced to flee their homes and never return, and still today have no idea what happened to their relatives and friends who they were separated from”, says Henrik Attorps. Facts about the investigation: • Approximately 270 interviews. • Approximately 150 persons have been interviewed. • An investigation report consisting more than 80 000 pages. Stockholm District Court case number: B 11304-14 Contact The prosecutors are available today, Thursday 11 November 13.00-15.00 for interviews in person and 15.00-16.00 for interviews by phone. All interviews must be booked in advance at [email protected] by 12.00 today. When the editorial staff has registered, we will return with an exact time for the interview. Public Prosecutor Henrik Attorps, Head of the Investigation Public Prosecutor Karolina Wieslander Chief Public Prosecutor Krister Petersson   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Prosecution for War Crimes in Iran

    Today, a decision has been taken to prosecute an Iranian citizen suspected of committing grave war crimes and murder in Iran during 1988. The Swedish public prosecutors Kristina Lindhoff Carleson and Martina Winslow are available for brief comments this afternoon.

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    Today, a decision has been taken to prosecute an Iranian citizen suspected of committing grave war crimes and murder in Iran during 1988. The Swedish public prosecutors Kristina Lindhoff Carleson and Martina Winslow are available for brief comments this afternoon.

    Part 1: War crimes Between 1981 and 1988 there was an international armed conflict between Iran and Iraq. In the final phase of this armed conflict, Iran was attacked on several occasions, including on 26 July 1988, by an armed branch of the political organisation, Iranian People's Mujahedin. The Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini, shortly afterwards issued an order to execute all prisoners held in Iranian prisons who sympathised with and were loyal in their convictions to the Mujahedin. Following this order, a large number of such prisoners were executed between 30 July and 16 August 1988 in the Gohardasht prison in Karaj, Iran. According to the indictment, at the time of these mass executions the accused held the position of assistant to the deputy prosecutor at the Gohardasht prison. The accused is suspected of participating, together with other perpetrators, in these mass executions and, as such, intentionally taking the lives of a large number of prisoners, who sympathised with the Mujahedin and, additionally, of subjecting prisoners to severe suffering which is deemed torture and inhuman treatment. The indictment further states that the Mujahedin was involved in the international armed conflict between Iran and Iraq. The Mujahedin’s attacks originated in Iraqi territory, and were carried out in cooperation with the Iraqi army. It is stated that there was a connection between the armed conflict and these mass executions, which is why these acts are deemed as a grave crime committed in violation of internationalhumanitarian law. Part 2: Murder                                                        At some point between these mass executions and 27 August 1988, the Iranian leadership decided that other political prisoners held in Iranian prisons and who sympathised with various left wing groups and were regarded as apostates by the Iranian leadership, should be executed. As a result, a large number of these prisoners were executed between 27 August and 6 September 1988 in the Gohardasht prison in Karaj, Iran. According to the indictment filed today, the accused is suspected of intentionally killing, together with other perpetrators, a large number of prisoners who sympathised with various left wing groups and who were regarded as apostates. These acts are classified as murder according to the Swedish Penal Code since they are not considered to be related to an armed conflict. “War crimes are considered to be some of the most serious criminal acts not only within our national legislation, but also within the international law. These types of crimes are regarded as so grave that, irrespective of who committed them or where they were committed, national courts are able and obligated to conduct proceedings where necessary. Therefore, legal proceedings can be initiated also in Sweden, due to international obligations and the principle of universal jurisdiction,” stated public prosecutor Kristina Lindhoff Carleson. “This extensive investigation resulting in this indictment shows that even though these acts were committed beyond Sweden’s territory and for more than three decades ago, they can be subject to legal proceedings in Sweden,” stated Public Prosecutor Kristina Lindhoff Carleson. “Swedish domestic legislation does not include crimes against humanity committed before 1 July 2014 and could not be relied on in this indictment as the alleged criminal acts took place before that date. Therefore, the indictment involves crimes against the international law i.e. war crimes as well as murder,” Kristina Lindhoff Carleson clarifies. Victims, witnesses and experts in the field from various parts of the world will be heard during the proceedings, which are expected to commence on 10 August 2021 and continue until April 2022. Case number in the Stockholm District Court: B 15255-19.   Contact  The public prosecutors are available today for brief comments between the hours of 13.00–15.00. Kristina Lindhoff Carleson, +46 10 562 54 31 Martina Winslow, +46 10 562 54 21   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • New Content on Prosecutor.se

    The Swedish Prosecution Authority´s English webpage has been updated. The purpose is to offer new content which is better adapted to foreign visitors. The webpage now contains answers to frequently asked questions about how the Swedish judicial system works, and prosecutors´ role within it.

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    The Swedish Prosecution Authority´s English webpage has been updated. The purpose is to offer new content which is better adapted to foreign visitors. The webpage now contains answers to frequently asked questions about how the Swedish judicial system works, and prosecutors´ role within it.

    A new part of the webpage that aims to raise awareness of the Swedish judicial system is a timeline describing the various stages from when a person is arrested to when a verdict is given. “The timeline´s aim is to guide our visitors through prosecutors´ central role, and at the same time provide knowledge about how the Swedish judicial system works,” says Karin Rosander, Director of Communication. One of the target groups who visit the webpage is foreign journalists in need of assistance in gaining knowledge of Swedish prosecutors´ role. “Our Swedish judicial system is different if you compare it to other countries. For example, we do not have a bail system, state or district public prosecutors, or a jury in Sweden. It´s important that this is clear when journalists report on Swedish cases of international interest,” says Karin Rosander. www.prosecutor.se   Contact  Director of Communication, Karin Rosander, +46 10 562 50 10.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • Investigation into serious breach of data secrecy by Russian intelligence agency discontinued

    During the period December 2017 to May 2018, the Swedish Sports Confederation was the target of repeated and comprehensive breaches of their computer system in Sweden. The offence is classified as serious breach of data secrecy. Today, the prosecutor has decided to discontinue the investigation due to the lack of the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden.

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    During the period December 2017 to May 2018, the Swedish Sports Confederation was the target of repeated and comprehensive breaches of their computer system in Sweden. The offence is classified as serious breach of data secrecy. Today, the prosecutor has decided to discontinue the investigation due to the lack of the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden.

    Under the direction of a prosecutor from the National Security Unit, the Swedish Security Service has investigated who or what has carried out the data breaches and for what purpose. The investigation has cooperated with several other nation’s security services. ”The investigation shows that the Russian military intelligence, GRU who, via its 85th Center, also known as unit 26165, has planned and carried out the serious breaches of data secrecy against the Swedish Sports Confederation. We can further state that the breaches have been a part of a Russian campaign directed against national and international anti-doping organisations such as WADA and USADA. The campaign has also been directed against FIFA,” says public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist. The data breaches have resulted in GRU accessing Swedish athletes’ personal details, such as medical records. ”The information has been published openly and, based on these details, Swedish media have written articles which follow GRU’s narrative of discrediting athletes and sports organisations in the West,” says Mats Ljungqvist. “Against the background of parties acting for a foreign power, in this case Russia, we have reached the conclusion that the necessary preconditions for taking legal proceedings abroad or extradition to Sweden are lacking. I have, therefore, today decided to discontinue the investigation,” concludes Mats Ljungqvist. Contact Public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist is available for the media today between 11 am to 1 pm by phone +46 10 562 54 29.   Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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  • A person indicted for espionage

    Today, a 47-year old man has been indicted for espionage. The person is suspected of meeting a Russian diplomat over a number of years with the purpose of providing information in return for money. The investigation has been undertaken by the Swedish Security Service under the direction of a prosecutor at the National Security Unit of the Swedish Prosecution Authority. The prosecutor is available for the media today.

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    Today, a 47-year old man has been indicted for espionage. The person is suspected of meeting a Russian diplomat over a number of years with the purpose of providing information in return for money. The investigation has been undertaken by the Swedish Security Service under the direction of a prosecutor at the National Security Unit of the Swedish Prosecution Authority. The prosecutor is available for the media today.

    ”As a consultant at his former workplaces, I allege that he has obtained material with the purpose of providing information to a foreign power, in this case Russia. He has been well-paid for this information, and this shows the value the Russians place on the information provided. The man was apprehended whilst meeting a Russian diplomat where he had just received 27 800 Swedish crowns from the diplomat,” says the prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist. According to the indictment, the man has illegally transferred material from his work computer to his private computer and thereafter to USB memory sticks. In order to hide his activities from being logged by the IT system, he has also, amongst other things, photographed material from the screen of his work computer. In the prosecutor’s view, this case concerns a crime that places Sweden’s security at risk. ”The investigators have put in a lot of time in order to understand the material so as to assess it from the perspective of Sweden’s security. It is important to emphasise that Sweden is the injured party in this case and not the companies. This is because the suspect originally had authorisation from his employers to access the material in his position. To disseminate such company secrets which a person has access to in their position is not a crime in itself. It can, however, be espionage,” says Mats Ljungqvist. The maximum punishment for the crime of espionage is six years’ imprisonment. ”My view is that the crime is serious and, if convicted, the suspect could expect a lengthy sentence,” concludes Mats Ljungqvist. Case reference number 18657-20, Gothenburg District Court. Contact Public prosecutor Mats Ljungqvist is available for the media today until 13.30, +46 10 562 54 29.     Press Service, +46 10 562 50 20

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